CCS technologies could reduce the lifecycle GHG emissions of fossil fuel power plants - the IPCC report says

CCS technologies could reduce the lifecycle GHG emissions of fossil fuel power plants - the IPCC report says

CCS technologies could reduce the lifecycle GHG emissions of fossil fuel power plants - the IPCC report says

Source: IPCC
Date: 13 April
 

“While all components of integrated CCS systems exist and are in use today by the fossil fuel extraction and refining industry, CCS has not yet been applied at scale to a large, operational commercial fossil fuel power plant. CCS power plants could be seen in the market if this is incentivized by regulation and/or if they become competitive with their unabated counterparts, if the additional investment and operational costs, caused in part by efficiency reductions, are compensated by sufficiently high carbon prices (or direct financial support).

For the large scale future deployment of CCS, well defined regulations concerning short‐ and long term responsibilities for storage are needed as well as economic incentives. Barriers to large-scale deployment of CCS technologies include concerns about the operational safety and long‐term integrity of CO2 storage as well as transport risks. There is, however, a growing body of literature on how to ensure the integrity of CO2 wells, on the potential consequences of a pressure build‐up within a geologic formation caused by CO2 storage (such as induced seismicity), and on the potential human health and environmental impacts from CO2 that migrates out of the primary injection zone

Combining bioenergy with CCS (BECCS) offers the prospect of energy supply with large‐scale net negative emissions which plays an important role in many low‐stabilization scenarios, while it entails challenges and risks (limited evidence, medium agreement). These challenges and risks include those associated with the upstream large‐scale provision of the biomass that is used in the CCS facility as well as those associated with the CCS technology itself.”

Read the full report here.