News

The controlled production of brine from rocks deep beneath the North Sea can greatly increase the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) that can be injected for storage and help to reduce the cost per tonne of tackling the UK’s carbon emissions, according to new research.

A multi-disciplinary project, funded by the Energy Technologies Institute (ETI), has studied how brine production, more often associated with oil and gas operations, can enhance the storage potential of saline aquifers already identified as ideal CO2 stores. 

Network Analyses

The EU CCS Project Demonstration Network published its third annual report that covers technology progress of different parts of the CCS chain, updates on regulatory developments, summary of efforts related public engagement, costs and knowledge-sharing beyond the Network.

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