Scottish scientists at the centre of £7.6m UK push on CCS research

Scottish scientists at the centre of £7.6m UK push on CCS research

Source: SCCS

Scottish scientists engaged in frontline research into carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology will continue to play a key role in the UK CCS Research Centre (UKCCSRC), which has today received £7.6 million funding to extend its work for a further five years.

The UKCCSRC project, which will be led by Professor Jon Gibbins at the University of Sheffield, has been awarded £6.1m funding through the Research Councils UK Energy Programme, with an additional £1.5m coming from partner institutions.

Three of the Scottish Carbon Capture and Storage (SCCS) partner institutes – British Geological Survey, the University of Edinburgh and the University of Strathclyde – will join other project partners from across the UK, and key academics will form part of the UKCCSRC Management Team or undertake lead research roles.

The Centre’s stated mission is to ensure CCS technology “plays an effective role” in reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, supporting a competitive UK industrial sector and helping to provide access to affordable and secure electricity. Its research programme will include a Community Network of more than 1000 individual researchers, an Early Career researcher programme and core research work covering capture technology, CO2 storage, energy systems and policy and public engagement.

Stuart Haszeldine, SCCS Director and Deputy Director for Storage on the UKCCSRC Management Team, said: “This strategic research investment into the direct reduction of carbon emissions is welcome and essential. The continued support for the UK CCS Research Centre will boost efforts to improve geological carbon storage for the UK, where uniquely accessible natural assets are low in cost and high in reliability. Removing carbon emissions from industry, heat and transport will future-proof the UK economy against clean air taxes and will improve near-term health and long-term competitiveness. Carbon management is an essential component of the sustainable energy transition, which cannot be achieved by renewables alone.”

SCCS academics, who will play a key role in the Centre’s work, include:

·       Prof Stuart Haszeldine (School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh) as Deputy Director for Storage on the UKCCSRC Management Team

·       Dr Hannah Chalmers (School of Engineering, University of Edinburgh) as Co-Investigator

·       Dr Stuart Gilfillan (School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh) as Co-Investigator

·       Dr Mathieu Lucquiaud (School of Engineering, University of Edinburgh) as Co-Investigator