Poland could violate law with new power plants – EU climate chief says

Poland could violate law with new power plants – EU climate chief says

Date: 01 Oct 2013

Source:  Responding To Climate Change

Accessibility: Publicly available

Poland could be breaking EU law if it goes ahead with the construction of two new units at its Opole power plant, Climate Commissioner Connie Hedegaard suggests. By failing to assess the units for their ability to incorporate carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology, Poland is acting in direct violation of EU regulations. The two power plants, each capable of generating 900MW of power, would emit 1.5 billion tonnes of CO2 over the next 55 years. CCS technology would capture these emissions and store them safely in underground geological formations, preventing them from escaping into the atmosphere. Six MEPs from five separate parties issued a set of questions to the Climate Commission on the subject of the two intended coal units in July. Responding this week, Commissioner Hedegaard indicated that the Commission would pursue further action if it turned out that Poland was contravening the law. “The Commission has received a complaint on this issue and is currently gathering information to determine facts and law concerning the case of the planned two new units at the Opole power plant,” she wrote. She added that “Member States and their competent authorities are not relieved from the obligation to apply [EU Directives] in case of failure to transpose them.”